Instructions

 

Task 3 explores code-switching practices. You may want to ask two volunteers to read the dialogue. Bring to students’ attention that the speakers are not only switching from one language to another but are also using two languages in one sentence. 

Suggested time: 2 minutes

 

 

This is a warm-up to activate students' schemata about their own code-switching practices.

Students can work in pairs or in small groups and share a few ideas about each question.

Suggested time: 5 minutes 

 

 

 

Show the video and ask students to take notes about reasons why people code-switch. Then, ask students if they ever code-switch for the same purposes. You may also want to ask students if there are other reasons why they would code-switch.

Suggested time: 10 minutes

 

 

 

 

Go over some of the reasons why people code-switch and ask students for examples of their own. You may also want to ask them for other reasons.

Suggested time: 5 minutes

 

 

 

Get students to work in groups of 3. Give them about 5 minutes to prepare a role-play. Have groups present their role-play in front of the class and tell them that the audience will try to identify the three items in the slide: type of code-switch; languages/dialects used; reasons why code-switching occured

Suggested time: 10 minutes

 

 

 

Ask the 2 questions to the whole class and have them share a few thoughts.

Suggested time: 5 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the end of task 3. For a copy of this task and video used, download the documents below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funding and Awards

 

University of Toronto

Ontario Graduate Scholarhip (OGS)

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)

The International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF) - Doctoral Disseration Grant 2017

International Foundation Program (IFP) at New College - University of Toronto - Senior Doctoral Fellowship 2017

Graduate Student Award, Multilingual Matters - American Association of Applied Linguistics 2018

Leithwood Award for OISE/University of Toronto Best Dissertation of the Year 2018